Discovering yourself on Google Street View

We’ve all seen those funny staged, and not so staged Google Street View shots but you never expect to find yourself in one! Well back in 2009 I made an appearance.

Appearing outside the Crowne Plaza hotel. This image no longer appears on Street View though

Jogging outside Sydney’s Crowne Plaza hotel back in 2009

My moment took place when I was running back to our Crowne Plaza hotel in Darling Harbour, Sydney after forgetting something or other, when I remember spotting a little white car out of the corner of my eye with a camera attached to its roof. At the time I didn’t think much of it as it wasn’t emblazoned with any obvious Google or CCTV logos. Either way I got what I needed from the hotel room and carried on with my day.

On returning back to England a few months later I did check a few times, more out of curiosity, wondering if it was actually a Google Street View car that I’d seen, but initially to no avail – the Street View of the area outside the hotel was still showing images from a previous year.

Then in 2011 came some success! Google had updated its images albeit over a year after my visit and there I was, three or four shots in total, a blurred face in each, as I rounded the corner at pace! I must have been in a rush! And here’s the current link to show you the screenshot below – https://goo.gl/maps/fXC4Yg5EEwo.

Running down Bathurst Street, Sydney

Running down Bathurst Street, Sydney

The great thing with Street View is that it has a timeframe view on the desktop version, so even if they update these images with more recent photos I’ll always be able to go back and choose the year that I was featured in.

Now of course you’re unlikely to just “find yourself” surfing randomly around Street View but maybe check out your own road or place of work and you never know! You might see a neighbour at least, or a previous tenant, or a colleague or even a burglar! Obviously if you discover an actual Google Street View car during the course of the day you’ll have that vital split second to decide what to do! Keep walking?, pull a Usain Bolt pose?, feign a death on the pavement?, or most likely do nothing out of the ordinary. If you do see a Google car go by though do remember to check back every few months to see if you eventually appear for all the world to see just like I did.

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About to turn into Day Street

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Rounding the corner into Day Street

Almost at the hotel entrance

Almost at the hotel entrance!

Has anybody else ever dicovered themselves on Google Street View? 🙂

Dreiländereck – walk across 3 countries in 10 minutes

A friend of mine turned 40 recently and for his birthday he wanted to fly into Basel, head to the Black Forest to watch some snowboarding cross, and then watch FC Freiburg in a Bundesliga game. The perfect opportunity to walk from one country, into another, into another then!

The Dreiländereck monument on Swiss soil. Not much to do there but it was a dreary day

The Dreiländereck monument on Swiss soil. Not much to do there but it was a dreary day

Dreiländereck (also spelt Dreilaendereck) is a tripoint just outside of Basel where France, Germany and Switzerland’s borders all meet. This tripoint is one of the only ones within a major city (Basel) and an iron pylon monument shaped like a rocket celebrates the fact … even though the actual tripoint is 150m NW of it in the middle of the River Rhine (the Dreiländereck scuplture is therefore 150m to the SE on Swiss soil). Ever the stickler for detail I wanted to walk across the two actual borders. I had my passport with me as I’d just arrived from the airport but never needed to show it once as everything’s open for you to walk “to and fro” as you please.

In total from my starting point in France, across the bridge into Germany and then down into Switzerland it’s a 9 minute, 700m walk. From the French starting point to the actual Dreiländereck monument it’s a 32 minutes and 2.6km walk.

Walking from France into Germany into Switzerland

Walking from France into Germany into Switzerland

 

To get there you will most likely arrive from Basel-Freiburg airport. Ask for a taxi outside to the ‘Passerelle des Trois Pays bridge’ (Dreiländereck bridge), or Huningen on the French side of the river, or just point on Google Maps on your phone like I did. The taxi cost from the airport was approximately €12.50 and was a 10 minutes drive. Exiting the airport from the French side “may” be cheaper unless both the French and Swiss sides share the same taxi rank?

The Dreiländereck Bridge outside the La Huninguoise bar in French Huningue

The Dreiländereck Bridge outside the La Huninguoise bar in French Huningue

Once you get dropped off you walk across the bridge from France (Huningen) into Germany (Friedlingen) with the actual border on the floor being unmarked (instead there’s a plaque on the railings in the middle of the bridge). The ideal time to post a social media status of “I’m in France”, followed by one 15 seconds later “I’m in Germany”!” I walked to and fro a few times before realising It was probably a bit strange-looking, especially as I still had my wheelie case hand luggage with me.

Walking across the Dreiländereck Bridge from France into Germany

Walking across the Dreiländereck Bridge from France into Germany

 

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On the border between France and Germany looking out over The Rhine. France right, Switzerland left

From there walk down the bridge into Germany and you’ll see a bench to match the one on the French side with “Gemeinsam Ăźber Grenzen wachsen” written on the side (Grow together across borders). Quite apt in the current times what with the USA/Mexico situation.

“Gemeinsam uber Grenzen wachsen” – grow together over borders

From the foot of the bridge I walked onto German soil, past the Rheincenter shopping centre before turning right at the roundabout into Zollstraße. There, 150 m along near the German/Swiss border is a tram stop which looks like it’s a border control but is actually just a ticket booth for the tram. The border line is level with the centre of the spaceship-like building in the middle of the road marked with a 10cm wide line of stones in the ground.

Approaching the German/Swiss border level with those red/white barriers

Approaching the German/Swiss border level with those red/white barriers

 

The Dreiländereck monument on the left and bridge separating France and Germany on the right

The Dreiländereck monument on the left and bridge separating France and Germany on the right

 

Getting closer! 500m to go to the monument

Getting closer! 500m to go to the monument

I chose to walk along the main road, across the bridge into Switzerland, but according to Google Maps there is a slightly shorter footpath just across the Swiss border (taking 1.5km instead of 1.8km to the Dreiländereck monument). However up on the bridge it’s a nicer/safer walk and you get a good view of the Dreiländereck that you’re heading towards, which is on a long spit of land, jutting out along an industrial road. A scenic route it is certainly not, but it’s a destination to aim for so you can least say you’ve been there.

The monument has the 3 flags on its side but there’s little to actually do when you get there and little to read. For me walking across the borders was the enjoyable and novelty part, especially walking over the bridge from France into Germany. On a sunny, Summer’s day I’m sure it’s a lot nicer and you could sit by the river watching the world go by, with the nearby restaurants most likely being fully open. I imagine there wil be some pleasure boat rides too? Maybe you can boat from Germany into Switzerland instead 🙂

The Dreiländereck monument on a dreary February afternoon

The Dreiländereck monument on a dreary February afternoon